Skip to end of metadata
Go to start of metadata

GlobalSearch & GlobalCapture allow you to display dates, times, and currencies in a customized or localized format.  This will allow you to change how the data is displayed in the index fields without modifying the actual data that is stored in the database.  You can set this up by configuring the data mask in the “format” field in the field catalog in the LAN and Web Client.

GlobalSearch uses the Windows date/time & currency formatting placeholders that are built into Windows.

Format specifierDescriptionExamples
“d”The day of the month, from 1 through 31.

More information: The “d” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-01T13:45:30 -> 1

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 15

“dd”The day of the month, from 01 through 31.

More information: The “dd” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-01T13:45:30 -> 01

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 15

“ddd”The abbreviated name of the day of the week.

More information: The “ddd” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> Mon (en-US)

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> Пн (ru-RU)

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> lun. (fr-FR)

“dddd”The full name of the day of the week.

More information: The “dddd” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> Monday (en-US)

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> понедельник (ru-RU)

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> lundi (fr-FR)

“f”The tenths of a second in a date and time value.

More information: The “f” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30.6170000 -> 6

2009-06-15T13:45:30.05 -> 0

“ff”The hundredths of a second in a date and time value.

More information: The “ff” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30.6170000 -> 61

2009-06-15T13:45:30.0050000 -> 00

“fff”The milliseconds in a date and time value.

More information: The “fff” Custom Format Specifier.

6/15/2009 13:45:30.617 -> 617

6/15/2009 13:45:30.0005 -> 000

“ffff”The ten thousandths of a second in a date and time value.

More information: The “ffff” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30.6175000 -> 6175

2009-06-15T13:45:30.0000500 -> 0000

“fffff”The hundred thousandths of a second in a date and time value.

More information: The “fffff” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30.6175400 -> 61754

6/15/2009 13:45:30.000005 -> 00000

“ffffff”The millionths of a second in a date and time value.

More information: The “ffffff” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30.6175420 -> 617542

2009-06-15T13:45:30.0000005 -> 000000

“fffffff”The ten millionths of a second in a date and time value.

More information: The “fffffff” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30.6175425 -> 6175425

2009-06-15T13:45:30.0001150 -> 0001150

“F”If non-zero, the tenths of a second in a date and time value.

More information: The “F” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30.6170000 -> 6

2009-06-15T13:45:30.0500000 -> (no output)

“FF”If non-zero, the hundredths of a second in a date and time value.

More information: The “FF” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30.6170000 -> 61

2009-06-15T13:45:30.0050000 -> (no output)

“FFF”If non-zero, the milliseconds in a date and time value.

More information: The “FFF” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30.6170000 -> 617

2009-06-15T13:45:30.0005000 -> (no output)

“FFFF”If non-zero, the ten thousandths of a second in a date and time value.

More information: The “FFFF” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30.5275000 -> 5275

2009-06-15T13:45:30.0000500 -> (no output)

“FFFFF”If non-zero, the hundred thousandths of a second in a date and time value.

More information: The “FFFFF” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30.6175400 -> 61754

2009-06-15T13:45:30.0000050 -> (no output)

“FFFFFF”If non-zero, the millionths of a second in a date and time value.

More information: The “FFFFFF” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30.6175420 -> 617542

2009-06-15T13:45:30.0000005 -> (no output)

“FFFFFFF”If non-zero, the ten millionths of a second in a date and time value.

More information: The “FFFFFFF” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30.6175425 -> 6175425

2009-06-15T13:45:30.0001150 -> 000115

“g”, “gg”The period or era.

More information: The “g” or “gg” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30.6170000 -> A.D.
“h”The hour, using a 12-hour clock from 1 to 12.

More information: The “h” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T01:45:30 -> 1

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 1

“hh”The hour, using a 12-hour clock from 01 to 12.

More information: The “hh” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T01:45:30 -> 01

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 01

“H”The hour, using a 24-hour clock from 0 to 23.

More information: The “H” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T01:45:30 -> 1

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 13

“HH”The hour, using a 24-hour clock from 00 to 23.

More information: The “HH” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T01:45:30 -> 01

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 13

“K”Time zone information.

More information: The “K” Custom Format Specifier.

With DateTime values:

2009-06-15T13:45:30, Kind Unspecified ->

2009-06-15T13:45:30, Kind Utc -> Z

2009-06-15T13:45:30, Kind Local -> -07:00 (depends on local computer settings)

With DateTimeOffset values:

2009-06-15T01:45:30-07:00 –> -07:00

2009-06-15T08:45:30+00:00 –> +00:00

“m”The minute, from 0 through 59.

More information: The “m” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T01:09:30 -> 9

2009-06-15T13:29:30 -> 29

“mm”The minute, from 00 through 59.

More information: The “mm” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T01:09:30 -> 09

2009-06-15T01:45:30 -> 45

“M”The month, from 1 through 12.

More information: The “M” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 6
“MM”The month, from 01 through 12.

More information: The “MM” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 06
“MMM”The abbreviated name of the month.

More information: The “MMM” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> Jun (en-US)

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> juin (fr-FR)

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> Jun (zu-ZA)

“MMMM”The full name of the month.

More information: The “MMMM” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> June (en-US)

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> juni (da-DK)

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> uJuni (zu-ZA)

“s”The second, from 0 through 59.

More information: The “s” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:09 -> 9
“ss”The second, from 00 through 59.

More information: The “ss” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:09 -> 09
“t”The first character of the AM/PM designator.

More information: The “t” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> P (en-US)

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 午 (ja-JP)

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> (fr-FR)

“tt”The AM/PM designator.

More information: The “tt” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> PM (en-US)

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 午後 (ja-JP)

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> (fr-FR)

“y”The year, from 0 to 99.

More information: The “y” Custom Format Specifier.

0001-01-01T00:00:00 -> 1

0900-01-01T00:00:00 -> 0

1900-01-01T00:00:00 -> 0

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 9

2019-06-15T13:45:30 -> 19

“yy”The year, from 00 to 99.

More information: The “yy” Custom Format Specifier.

0001-01-01T00:00:00 -> 01

0900-01-01T00:00:00 -> 00

1900-01-01T00:00:00 -> 00

2019-06-15T13:45:30 -> 19

“yyy”The year, with a minimum of three digits.

More information: The “yyy” Custom Format Specifier.

0001-01-01T00:00:00 -> 001

0900-01-01T00:00:00 -> 900

1900-01-01T00:00:00 -> 1900

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 2009

“yyyy”The year as a four-digit number.

More information: The “yyyy” Custom Format Specifier.

0001-01-01T00:00:00 -> 0001

0900-01-01T00:00:00 -> 0900

1900-01-01T00:00:00 -> 1900

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 2009

“yyyyy”The year as a five-digit number.

More information: The “yyyyy” Custom Format Specifier.

0001-01-01T00:00:00 -> 00001

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> 02009

“z”Hours offset from UTC, with no leading zeros.

More information: The “z” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30-07:00 -> -7
“zz”Hours offset from UTC, with a leading zero for a single-digit value.

More information: The “zz” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30-07:00 -> -07
“zzz”Hours and minutes offset from UTC.

More information: The “zzz” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30-07:00 -> -07:00
“:”The time separator.

More information: The “:” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> : (en-US)

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> . (it-IT)

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> : (ja-JP)

“/”The date separator.

More Information: The “/” Custom Format Specifier.

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> / (en-US)

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> – (ar-DZ)

2009-06-15T13:45:30 -> . (tr-TR)

string

string

Literal string delimiter.

More information: Character literals.

2009-06-15T13:45:30 (“arr:” h:m t) -> arr: 1:45 P

2009-06-15T13:45:30 (‘arr:’ h:m t) -> arr: 1:45 P

%Defines the following character as a custom format specifier.

More information:Using Single Custom Format Specifiers.

2009-06-15T13:45:30 (%h) -> 1
\The escape character.

More information: Character literals and Using the Escape Character.

2009-06-15T13:45:30 (h \h) -> 1 h
Any other characterThe character is copied to the result string unchanged.

More information: Character literals.

2009-06-15T01:45:30 (arr hh:mm t) -> arr 01:45 A

 

Number Formatting:

Format specifierNameDescriptionExamples
“C” or “c”CurrencyResult: A currency value.

Supported by: All numeric types.

Precision specifier: Number of decimal digits.

Default precision specifier: Defined by NumberFormatInfo.CurrencyDecimalDigits.

More information: The Currency (“C”) Format Specifier.

123.456 (“C”, en-US) -> $123.46

123.456 (“C”, fr-FR) -> 123,46 €

123.456 (“C”, ja-JP) -> ¥123

-123.456 (“C3”, en-US) -> ($123.456)

-123.456 (“C3”, fr-FR) -> -123,456 €

-123.456 (“C3”, ja-JP) -> -¥123.456

“D” or “d”DecimalResult: Integer digits with optional negative sign.

Supported by: Integral types only.

Precision specifier: Minimum number of digits.

Default precision specifier: Minimum number of digits required.

More information: The Decimal(“D”) Format Specifier.

1234 (“D”) -> 1234

-1234 (“D6”) -> -001234

“E” or “e”Exponential (scientific)Result: Exponential notation.

Supported by: All numeric types.

Precision specifier: Number of decimal digits.

Default precision specifier: 6.

More information: The Exponential (“E”) Format Specifier.

1052.0329112756 (“E”, en-US) -> 1.052033E+003

1052.0329112756 (“e”, fr-FR) -> 1,052033e+003

-1052.0329112756 (“e2”, en-US) -> -1.05e+003

-1052.0329112756 (“E2”, fr_FR) -> -1,05E+003

“F” or “f”Fixed-pointResult: Integral and decimal digits with optional negative sign.

Supported by: All numeric types.

Precision specifier: Number of decimal digits.

Default precision specifier: Defined by NumberFormatInfo.NumberDecimalDigits.

More information: The Fixed-Point (“F”) Format Specifier.

1234.567 (“F”, en-US) -> 1234.57

1234.567 (“F”, de-DE) -> 1234,57

1234 (“F1”, en-US) -> 1234.0

1234 (“F1”, de-DE) -> 1234,0

-1234.56 (“F4”, en-US) -> -1234.5600

-1234.56 (“F4”, de-DE) -> -1234,5600

“G” or “g”GeneralResult: The more compact of either fixed-point or scientific notation.

Supported by: All numeric types.

Precision specifier: Number of significant digits.

Default precision specifier: Depends on numeric type.

More information: The General (“G”) Format Specifier.

-123.456 (“G”, en-US) -> -123.456

-123.456 (“G”, sv-SE) -> -123,456

123.4546 (“G4”, en-US) -> 123.5

123.4546 (“G4”, sv-SE) -> 123,5

-1.234567890e-25 (“G”, en-US) -> -1.23456789E-25

-1.234567890e-25 (“G”, sv-SE) -> -1,23456789E-25

“N” or “n”NumberResult: Integral and decimal digits, group separators, and a decimal separator with optional negative sign.

Supported by: All numeric types.

Precision specifier: Desired number of decimal places.

Default precision specifier: Defined by NumberFormatInfo.NumberDecimalDigits.

More information: The Numeric (“N”) Format Specifier.

1234.567 (“N”, en-US) -> 1,234.57

1234.567 (“N”, ru-RU) -> 1 234,57

1234 (“N1”, en-US) -> 1,234.0

1234 (“N1”, ru-RU) -> 1 234,0

-1234.56 (“N3”, en-US) -> -1,234.560

-1234.56 (“N3”, ru-RU) -> -1 234,560

“P” or “p”PercentResult: Number multiplied by 100 and displayed with a percent symbol.

Supported by: All numeric types.

Precision specifier: Desired number of decimal places.

Default precision specifier: Defined byNumberFormatInfo.PercentDecimalDigits.

More information: The Percent (“P”) Format Specifier.

1 (“P”, en-US) -> 100.00 %

1 (“P”, fr-FR) -> 100,00 %

-0.39678 (“P1”, en-US) -> -39.7 %

-0.39678 (“P1”, fr-FR) -> -39,7 %

“R” or “r”Round-tripResult: A string that can round-trip to an identical number.

Supported by: SingleDouble, and BigInteger.

Precision specifier: Ignored.

More information: The Round-trip (“R”) Format Specifier.

123456789.12345678 (“R”) -> 123456789.12345678

-1234567890.12345678 (“R”) -> -1234567890.1234567

“X” or “x”HexadecimalResult: A hexadecimal string.

Supported by: Integral types only.

Precision specifier: Number of digits in the result string.

More information: The HexaDecimal (“X”) Format Specifier.

255 (“X”) -> FF

-1 (“x”) -> ff

255 (“x4”) -> 00ff

-1 (“X4”) -> 00FF

Any other single characterUnknown specifier

Result: Throws a FormatException at run time.


Write a comment…